Tag Archives: privilege

Before You Diss the Safety Pins…

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So Christopher Keelty posted an essay disparaging safety pins. To be fair he makes a few good points, however, it came off as extremely condescending and he showed a lack of understanding about the people behind the safety pin movement and their reasons for getting involved. He also completely seemed to forget that this was also a loss for white women that he disparaged in his article.

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Why Atheists Call Out Christians on Morality

One criticism I see lobbed at atheists is that we spend a lot of time calling attention to Christians who do immoral things, such as Catholic priests who sexually molest children. Why can’t we ever point out the good things that Christians are doing? Well, in the United States, we live in a country that equates Christianity with goodness. Christian and good morals are synonymous. It’s one of those things that goes without saying. Further, atheism is equated with being evil and is extremely disliked. As an atheist who grew up with a very ethical, atheistic family, it was painful to hear people calling atheists “immoral” and “evil” and to use the word “atheist” as a slur, all while beefing up their own moral creds.

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What Christians Don’t Get About Being Friendly

Suppose someone wants to get you to watch Star Wars. They heard that you never watched it, and they come up to you, friendly enough, and start talking about Star Wars while claiming to want to be your friend. You have no interest in seeing Star Wars, and say so. But they keep persisting. Or they might change the subject, but each time you run into this person, they bring up Star Wars.

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Fellow White People, It’s Past Time We Admitted It

Back when I was a college student I was driving my old Mitsubishi at night when I was stunned to see police headlights in my rearview mirror. I drove to a populated parking lot and pulled over, where a police officer informed me I had a busted tail light. He checked my licence and registration and wrote a citation for the light, and left. At no point was I ever instructed to put my hands in the air.

This morning I read about how a black man named Philando Castile was shot to death by a cop while reaching for his wallet during a traffic stop in Minnesota. Castile was pulled over because, like me, he had a busted tail light. Unlike me, he was treated like a criminal from the start. The first thing that the officer did was instruct Castile and his girlfriend, Reynolds, to put their hands in the air. For the record, Reynolds’ four year old daughter was in the backseat, which for a white family would likely have completed the innocent family image, but not for a black one. Once again, at no point during my traffic stop was I, a white woman, ever told to put my hands in the air. Further, as a woman driving alone at night, I was even able to drive a block after noticing the headlights so I could get to a crowded parking lot where I could feel safe pulling over. A black person trying to pull over at a safe spot would likely have been accused of attempting to flee.

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